Visit my online shop for dried herbs, herbal tinctures, essential oils and more!



Tell a Friend about Us




Herb garden

Vegetable garden

Sitemap

Articles about Herb Crops for the Garden

  Best Containers For Growing Herbs
  Culinary Herb Gardening
  Everyone Needs A Spaghetti Garden
  Herb garden ideas
  Ideas for a beautiful herb garden
  Organic Herbal Plants For Better Health
  Tips For Growing a Container Herb Garden
  How to grow African Marigold
  How to grow Ajowan
  How to grow Alfalfa
  How to grow Alkanet
  How to grow Aloe vera
  How to grow American Ginseng
  How to grow Angelica
  How to grow Anise
  How to grow Anise Hyssop
  How to grow Apple Mint
  How to grow Arnica
  How to grow Basil
  How to grow Bay
  How to grow Bergamot
  How to grow Betony
  How to grow Bistort
  How to grow Black Mustard
  How to grow Bog Myrtle
  How to grow Boneset
  How to grow Borage
  How to grow Caraway
  How to grow Catnip
  How to grow Chamomile
  How to grow Chervil
  How to grow Chives
  How to grow Clary
  How to grow Coltsfoot
  How to grow Comfrey
  How to grow Common Chicory
  How to grow Common Elder
  How to grow Common Foxglove
  How to grow Common Hop
  How to grow Common Juniper
  How to grow Common Larkspur
  How to grow Common Lavender
  How to grow Common Milkweed
  How to grow Common Myrtle
  How to grow Common Nettle
  How to grow Common Primrose
  How to grow Common Tansy
  How to grow Common Teasel
  How to grow Common Thyme
  How to grow Common Yarrow
  How to grow Coriander
  How to grow Corn Salad
  How to grow Corsican Mint
  How to grow Costmary
  How to grow Cotton Lavender
  How to grow Cowslip
  How to grow Cumin
  How to grow Curry Plant
  How to grow Dandelion
  How to grow Dill
  How to grow Echinacea
  How to grow Eucalyptus
  How to grow European Pennyroyal
  How to grow Evening Primrose
  How to grow Fat Hen
  How to grow Fenugreek
  How to grow Field Eryngo
  How to grow Field Poppy
  How to grow Flax
  How to grow French Marigold
  How to grow French Sorrel
  How to grow French Tarragon
  How to grow Garlic
  How to grow Garlic Chives
  How to grow Ginger
  How to grow Ginger Mint
  How to grow Globe Artichoke
  How to grow Goat's Rue
  How to grow Gobo
  How to grow Goldenrod
  How to grow Good King Henry
  How to grow Great Mullein
  How to grow Green Mint
  How to grow Heartsease
  How to grow Hemp
  How to grow Hemp Agrimony
  How to grow Herb Fennel
  How to grow Hollyhock
  How to grow Holy Basil
  How to grow Horseradish
  How to grow Hyssop
  How to grow Ice Plant
  How to grow Indian Tobacco
  How to grow Jacob's Ladder
  How to grow Lady's Bedstraw
  How to grow Lady's Mantle
  How to grow Lamb's Ears
  How to grow Leaf Celery
  How to grow Lemon Balm
  How to grow Lemon Basil
  How to grow Lemon Thyme
  How to grow Lemon Verbena
  How to grow Lesser Calamint
  How to grow Lily of the Valley
  How to grow Lovage
  How to grow Love in a Mist
  How to grow Love Lies Bleeding
  How to grow Lungwort
  How to grow Meadowsweet
  How to grow Mexican Marigold
  How to grow Mexican Tea
  How to grow Milk Thistle
  How to grow Mugwort
  How to grow Musk Mallow
  How to grow Nasturtium
  How to grow Opium Poppy
  How to grow Oregano
  How to grow Parsley
  How to grow Peppermint
  How to grow Poached Egg Plant
  How to grow Pot Marigold
  How to grow Pot Marjoram
  How to grow Prince's Feather
  How to grow Prostrate Rosemary
  How to grow Pyrethrum
  How to grow Ramsons
  How to grow Roman Coriander
  How to grow Rosemary
  How to grow Rue
  How to grow Russian Comfrey
  How to grow Safflower
  How to grow Saffron
  How to grow Sage
  How to grow Salad Burnet
  How to grow Salad Rocket
  How to grow Scented Solomon's Seal
  How to grow Sea Holly
  How to grow Self Heal
  How to grow Sesame
  How to grow Soapwort
  How to grow Southernwood
  How to grow St Benedict's Thistle
  How to grow St John's Wort
  How to grow Summer Purslane
  How to grow Summer Savory
  How to grow Sunflower
  How to grow Sweet Cicely (European)
  How to grow Sweet Joe Pye Weed
  How to grow Sweet Marjoram
  How to grow Sweet Violet
  How to grow Sweet Woodruff
  How to grow Thai Basil
  How to grow Thorn Apple
  How to grow Tormentil
  How to grow Valerian
  How to grow Vervain
  How to grow Viper's Bugloss
  How to grow Watercress
  How to grow Welsh Onion
  How to grow White Deadnettle
  How to grow White Horehound
  How to grow White Mustard
  How to grow Wild Feverfew
  How to grow Wild Strawberry
  How to grow Winter Purslane
  How to grow Winter Savory
  How to grow Witch Hazel
  How to grow Woad
  How to grow Woolly Foxglove
  How to grow Wormwood
  How to grow Yellow Melilot




About us

Privacy

Disclaimer

Frann Leach

Labelled with ICRA

DISCLOSURE:

We support this site using affiliate marketing as a way to earn revenue. All the ads, and many of the links mentioning other products, services, or websites are special links that earn us a commission when you use or pay for their product/service.

Please do not use our site if this alarms you.

Organic Gardening:


Everyone Needs A Spaghetti Garden


by

One of the delightful pleasures of life are herbs. Besides adding beauty to your garden they make foods taste better and provide a pleasant scent to the air we breathe. In George Washington days everyone had a herb garden that they used for culinary, teas and medicinal purposes. That practice is slowly coming back.

A spaghetti garden is one of the most popular kitchen gardens. Anyone that has a sunny patch of ground or a window-box can grow these herbs of parsley, garlic, basil, bay laurel and oregano. A small garden space can easily yield all the herbs that you’ll need for delicious Italian meals. They are even easy to grow in a sunny window for your year-round use.

Let us take a closer look at the spaghetti garden herbs:

Oregano is a perennial ground cover plant. Oregano is a prolific grower that can send out shoots that grow to six feet in a single season. If pruned and bunched, oregano can grow into a small border plant. It would rather have light, thin soil and lots of sun, so keep it on the south side of your garden. When the plants reach 4-5 inches harvesting can start. Pinch off the top 1/3 of the plant, just above a leaf intersection. The young leaves are actually stronger dried than fresh and are the most flavorful part of the plant. To dry, lay the leaves on newspaper or a drying screen in the sun until the leaves crumble easily. It will retain its flavor for months.

Bay leaves add a favorable hint of spice to stews, soups and spaghetti sauce. The bay laurel is a small tree that grows about a foot per year, this makes it suitable for growing in a container. If you live in a mild climate zone leave the container outside, but if temperatures go below 25 degrees keep the tree in a pot and bring it indoors during the winter.

Basil seeds itself so easily that you may never have to buy another plant after the first year. There are many different kinds of basil, but all grow rapidly and require frequent pinching back to prevent them from growing tall and leggy. When the plants have reached about 6-8 inches tall, you can begin harvesting. Pinch off the top 1/3 of the plant, just above a leaf intersection. Pinch off any flower buds before they go to seed. Six to eight plants will provide enough basil for the entire neighborhood.

Garlic is probably the easiest plant to grow. Break apart a clove of garlic, and plant the cloves about four inches apart, two to four inches deep in a light soil. Lightly water and watch them grow. You may harvest when tips of the leaves turn brown but do not let them flower. Just dig up the bulbs, and use them. To keep a fresh supply take one or two cloves from each bulb and replant them.

Parsley is probably the most used herb in the world. You will find both flat (Italian) and curly types. They complement the flavor of everything from sauces to hearty stews. It is used as a garnish on plates, or cut up and added to soups, dressings and salads. Parsley adds vitamins and color, and quietly brings out the flavor of other ingredients in the dish. Parsley is a biennial, flowering in its second season. It prefers a little shade on a hot sunny day, and should be kept watered to avoid wilting and drying. Pinch back older stems to the base, allowing new leaves and branches to grow.

Grow your own tomatoes and you are well on your way to becoming a Italian chef.



James makes it easy for you to understand herbs needed and knowing where to put them. If you need to know more about organic gardening or herbs visit: HERBS-www.basic-info-4-organic-fertilizers.com/herbs.html



Article ©2005 James Ellison. All rights reserved.

Top of page